In Memoriam: Philip Seymour Hoffman

The news today (2 February 2014) announced the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman.

He was a remarkable actor, able to play roles with great depth, but also able to find the quirky recesses of a personality. I first became aware of him in Scent of a Woman. His list of films is not nearly long enough, but he is unforgettable as Truman Capote, and he found the intensity of Gust Avrakotos in Charlie Wilson’s War. He also could shone in quieter roles, such as a classical violinist in A Late Quartet, alongside Christopher Walken and Capote costar Catherine Keener.

But there is one role that will always be one of my all-time favorites:

The Count

The film fits into my political philosophy, and Hoffman is a master of social revolution.

Mr. Hoffman, you didn’t have to do this to upstage the Superbowl. I’d have watched you bringing to life any role of your choice instead. But you will be remembered.

Crossposted at English 301: Reading and Writing.

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